Day 3. Nuremberg Rally Grounds and Courtroom 600

Nuremberg’s history is complex with its symbols of power from the days of the Holy Roman Empire in Germany to its dark Third Reich history as the ‘City of the Nazi Party Rallies’.  On our final morning in the city we took a tram to to the south east of the city to view the Nazi Documentation Centre and Rally Grounds. (Admission €6 and included in the Nuremberg Card).

Interim Exhibition at the Nuremberg Documentation Centre Rally Grounds
Interim Exhibition at the Nuremberg Documentation Centre Rally Grounds

The complex where the National Socialists held six rallies between 1933-38 covers approximately 4 sq. miles.  The Documentation Centre housed in the former congress hall was undergoing re-development at the time of our visit but an interim exhibition provided us with an overview of the history of the site.  This included a short video outlining the different buildings and monuments on the rally grounds, alongside a background to the rise of the Nazi party and the rallies held there.

The Dutzendteich Lake beside the Nuremberg Rally Grounds
The Dutzendteich Lake beside the Nuremberg Rally Grounds

On leaving the exhibition hall we walked beside the Dutzendteich Lake where information boards are located at various points providing more information of the actual locations and of how the site has been preserved since 1945 as a testament to the city’s history.

The Parade Ground at the Nuremberg Rally Grounds
The Parade Ground at the Nuremberg Rally Grounds

Our stroll took us along the vast parade road where Hitler supporters flocked to a series of mass rallies and to watch parades and processions.  Looking back we could see the curved façade of the congress hall made to seat up to 50,000 of his supporters.

The Grandstand, Nuremberg Rally Grounds
Remains of The Grandstand, Nuremberg Rally Grounds
Congress Hall, Nuremberg Rally Grounds
Congress Hall, Nuremberg Rally Grounds

After exploring the rally grounds we took the train to the central station then the metro across the city to Barenschanze so that we could visit Courtroom 600 of the Palace of Justice where the Nuremberg Trials took place.  (Admission €6 and included in the Nuremberg Card).  

Nuremberg Palace of Justice
Nuremberg Palace of Justice

The building was chosen as the location of the major War Criminals Trials for the surviving German Nazi leaders of the Second World War.  The choice of Nuremberg was symbolic as the Nazi Party had held its large rallies on the site we had just visited.  The city’s court was sufficiently large to host the trials and was connected by an underground tunnel to a prison from where the defendants could be securely transferred.

Memorium Museum, Nuremberg Trials
Memorium Museum, Nuremberg Trials

On the floor above the courtroom is a museum containing text, photos and video footage outlining the war criminals tried, their crimes and fate.  This also included  trial process and prosecution teams showing the courtroom in session with several of the war criminals defending themselves.  An excellent audio guide is included which was very informative.

Courtroom 600 Nuremberg
Courtroom 600 Nuremberg 

We then visited the notorious Courtroom 600 where the major War Criminals Trials took place between 20th November 1945 until 1st October 1946.  Seated in the courtroom we listened to the audio guide detailing the scale of the operation and the significance of the courtroom.  We learnt that eight judges were appointed, two from each of the allied nations, Great Britain, France, USA and the USSR.  The trials lasted much longer than anticipated and became the most expensive courtroom trials ever.

Tucher Mansion, Nuremberg
Tucher Mansion, Nuremberg
Dining Room, Tucher Mansion, Nuremberg
The Tucher Mansion Dining Room

Leaving the sombre mood of the Nuremberg Trials behind we took the UBahn to Rathenauplatz so that we could visit the Tucher Mansion built between 1533-1544.  Now a museum, it’s galleries recreate the world of Nuremberg’s 16th century merchant families.  Entrance to the museum is €6 (included in the Nuremberg Card).

Banqueting Hall, Tucher Mansion, Nuremberg
Banqueting Hall, Tucher Mansion

We began by exploring the grand entrance hall with its two vaulted ceilings and adjoining treasure chambers.  We then continued upstairs to view the former Tücher family living quarters, dining room, study and banqueting hall.  Numerous furnishings, tapestries and paintings on display are original to the family home from the 15th and 16th centuries.

The Tucher Mansion courtyard, Nuremberg
The Tucher Mansion courtyard

A door leads out into the Renaissance Garden with steps up to the Hirsvogel Hall next door.  The hall features wood panelling adorned with antique themes and a painted ceiling showing the Fall of Phaeton.  Visiting Tücher Mansion and the adjoining Hall had been very interesting and we were pleased to have been able to view its grandeur.

Hirsvogel Hall, Tucher Mansion, Nuremberg
Hirsvogel Hall, Tucher Mansion

Upon leaving the museum we returned to the metro and made good use of our Nuremberg Cards by retracing our steps somewhat going back past the courtroom stop on the way to Furth a neighbouring city fifteen minutes from Nuremberg.  The centre is noted for its architecture as it suffered only a few air raids during the Second World War leaving the majority of its buildings intact.

Fürth Old Town
Cobblestone streets of Furth’s old town

Fürth has more than 1,000 listed historical monuments, many of them along the Gustavastraße, one of the prettiest streets in the old town with its original half timbered houses.  Along here we called into a cosy cafe to warm up with cups of coffee.

Fürth Town Hall
Fürth Town Hall

We then continued onto the town hall, its design taking inspiration from the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence.  Another city centre landmark is the church of St. Michael which is the oldest standing church in the city.

St. Michael's Church, Fürth
St. Michael’s Church, Fürth

Our afternoon stroll continued along the grand Hornschuch Promenade which is lined on both sides with neoclassical mansions.  Germany’s first railway, the Ludwigsbahn used to run down the middle of the road but this has since been replaced by a lawned park surrounded by hedges and trees.

Hornschuch Promenade, Fürth
Hornschuch Promenade, Fürth

We then returned to Nuremberg where we had a final walk around parts of the old town and enjoyed a leisurely meal in one of the traditional beer halls.  After collecting our luggage from the hotel we caught the metro to the airport for our late evening flight home.

Nuremberg's medieval city walls
Nuremberg’s medieval city walls

Our weekend in Nuremberg had flown by as we’d enjoyed every minute of our time here.  This picturesque city combines beautiful architecture with world class museums and visitor attractions, and being compact is easily walkable.  We travelled to Nuremberg with Ryanair from London Stansted and since our visit BA have launched a new route from London Heathrow.

We were guests of Tourism Nuremberg and as always all views and opinions are entirely my own.

 

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Nuremberg Rally Ground & Courtroom 600

 

46 thoughts on “Day 3. Nuremberg Rally Grounds and Courtroom 600

  1. Pingback: Blogger Meeting • Streets of Nuremberg • Street Photography

  2. Thank you so much for this. My Mom is from Germany and was born in 1946. She was the youngest of three so she knew about all that happened during the War. I lost her in 2020 and have not been able to afford to go to her homeland yet. But I will! This has helped me a lot. Thank you!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I randomly happened upon this post, and am so glad I did. We lived near Fuerth in the early 1980s when the US Army had a significant presence in Germany. My husband was stationed there and his unit used the buildings that had housed their country’s army during the war. We went to the Rally Grounds on our own one day when it was quite quiet. An entrance to the inside of the stadium was open and we followed a few others into a hallway there where we saw writings on the walls by allied forces expressing the jubilation of their successful halt of that evil regime. That had more impact on me than anything else there or anything I’ve read about that time in history. Was that part of your tour? We didn’t know about the Tucher mansion or if it was open for touring that long ago, but the name reminded me of a favorite beer there, which I assume is how their wealth was made. I look forward to reading your other posts about Nuremberg and remembering the beauty and intrigue of the city.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Pingback: Day 3. Nuremberg Rally Grounds and Courtroom 600 – Lakewood Facts

  5. Oh the rally grounds really left their mark on me, I think they’ve done the museum so well and I love the symbolism of the dagger through the heart of the regime design. I also felt really funny going in to the courtroom, standing where all those people had sat – it’s good we’ve preserved this history so that the lessons continue to be shared. Although the world never seems to learn.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I wondered if you would make it out to the parade grounds. Do you know it’s used as a motorsports track once a year. The Norisring, as it’s known, is quite the oddest place I’ve ever been motor racing, and that includes the centre of Bucharest where the race was run around the old Presidential Palace and the media centre was in one of the marble lined rooms.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I appreciate you recounting your visit to the Nazi Documentation Centre and Rally Grounds and the Palace of Justice, as I visited both and got to learn about the dark history during and after Nazi Germany. I was surprised at how extensive their galleries were, and I got more insight into what really happened in a crucial part of human history. Never been to Tücher Mansion, but its Hirsvogel Hall is truly a sight to see. Glad you had a fun (and educational) time in Nuremberg!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Nuremberg is a fascinating place to visit, not least due to its inglorious history. I recently listened to an interview with Benjamin Ferencz, an American lawyer who was a chief US prosecutor in one of the Nuremberg trials. He is 102, still active and working, and a captivating witness to such momentous events. Fürth is incredibly charming, would love to visit someday.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. ThingsHelenLoves

    The Tucher Mansion- what a place! The lifestyle lived in that sort of home must have been a full time job. How the other half lived, hey? I’m sorely missing Germany at the moment, your posts have been a little Germany fix for me. Much appreciated!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes, life must have been very different for the well to do people living at the Tücher Mansion and it was fascinating to explore the property. Hopefully you’ll get an opportunity to return to Germany yourselves for a short break before too long.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I can imagine that visiting the Parade Ground and Courtroom 600 Nuremberg must have been interesting sites … we watched the drama “Nuremberg” some time ago – it was quite a gripping story.
    Thank you Marion for taking one last stroll through Nuremberg’s old city … I enjoyed your posts on this city, thanks for putting them together with such great information and photo’s.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. I’m planning a trip to Nuremburg for soon, I love the architecture and history there, but also going to make time for a trip to Furth too! Looks like you had a great time in Nuremburg 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

  12. Looks like you had a fabulous time Marion, love the old mansion. What wealth they must have had. The audio of the trials must have been interesting, I wondered how they defended themselves!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. The Trials were covered extremely well and the audio guides wee devised in a concise way. In other parts of the city we’d enjoyed the stunning architecture, delicious food and the friendliness of the local people. Thanks for taking the time to comment Alison, it’s much appreciated.

      Like

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